Spring Quarter, 2010

Hello, friends and family,

It’s mid-quarter now, and it’s my last quarter at the University of Washington. There will be a department celebration on Friday, June 11, at 7:00 in Kane Hall, room 130. You need a ticket to get in, and I’m allowed to give out 3 of them; there might possibly be more available in the future. The University Graduation is on Saturday, June 12. If you want a ticket, let me know, and I’ll try to get one for you. More details could be found here: http://uwgraduation.com/.

Lately, I’ve been sprucing up my résumé and cover letter, and I’ve been looking into all sorts of employment opportunities. I’m trying to find somewhere preferably in the area. Sometime this Summer, I may be heading down to Belize to intern for Innovatia, my uncle’s company, during which time I will be put on interesting projects, hopefully to build up an eye-catching résumé for when I return.

This quarter, I’m only taking one engineering class, EE 478, which is the capstone course for embedded computing systems. It’s been proving enough of a workload, especially since one of my lab partners decided he didn’t want to come to class or participate in group meetings. So I’ve been working hard to keep up with only one lab partner; but we’ve been pulling along alright. EE 478 does have a reputation as being one of the most time-consuming classes at the University of Washington. It even has its own Facebook page! My professor Dr. Peckol is known for his high expectations, especially on his lab reports, which tend to average around 50 pages each. Overall, in the four classes I’ve taken with Dr. Peckol, I must have written well over 500 pages of lab report; and more still to come!

Me

This past week, we had due a project to design a microcontroller-based scanning and imaging system to be mounted on a probe to be used for extra-planetary exploration. This probe has three cameras and a 2-Kbyte SRAM partitioned into two buffers. When one buffer is full, the contents are uploaded to a ‘mother ship’, then transmitted to an Earth data collection center. This lab was just an introduction to the PIC16F877a microcontroller, and to synchronous and asynchronous communication, namely I2C and RS-232 (which you wouldn’t use for space exploration). Anyway, after pulling some overnighters, we got our circuit working perfectly. Besides that, we Here is what it looks like:

I’ve learned in the past week that troubleshooting the PIC could be at times time consuming. A couple times during this project, we narrowed down to problems to lines of code that look perfectly normal, but cause the PIC to crash for some reason. The PIC controller has a lot of quirks that if you’re not familiar with them, could lead you to pull your hair out wondering why the processor keeps crashing. The most time consuming problem we faced is when we discovered that the breadboard we were using at the time was broken, and wasn’t connecting things together properly.

The last few weeks of class, I’m going to be working on the EE 478 final project, which entails creating a fairly complex embedded system. My lab partner and I are thinking about using one of the Amtel synth chips (particularly, the ATSAM2195) to create a musical instrument. I was thinking about tearing apart a cheap keyboard, and then designing the system that generates MIDI inputs for the chip. We’re in the planning phase right now, but there’s many ways we’re planning to increase the complexity of the system if we so desire. These projects tend to cost people around $200 to $300 for parts.

Anyway, I’ll try to blog more often when something pops to mind. Take care.