Last day at RPC

Yesterday was my last day as an organist at Resurrection Presbyterian Church, after 2½ years of providing services on the piano and organ. Members of RPC threw on a really nice reception for me, where I was given a farewell greeting. Thanks for everybody who put this together!

The reason I’m leaving is because I will be interning in Cayo, Belize, with my uncle, who is the head of a small Electrical Engineering company, Innovatia Laboratories. It’s pretty much an internship, and I’ll be getting personalized training from him. As of now, I’m not sure how long I’ll be down there, but it’d be too much of an expense to fly up and play every Sunday. Although I’m not leaving until some time mid-July, these next couple weeks are packed with busy work for all my classes (if you haven’t noticed by my other blog posts). I have to think about moving out of my apartment into storage, and figure out a way to get down there.

It has been my pleasure working with Pastor Scott. Now Saturday nights and Sunday mornings feel a bit awkward, since all the days of waking up super early to set up and practice and talk to Brooke for half an hour are now over. I’ve received a lot of positive feedback over the past couple months. I will definitely miss working there, and hopefully, I will find a similar job in the future. My goal is that as long as I’m alive, there will be at least one church with good music and good theology. Maybe one day, if I find a stable job in the Seattle-Tacoma area, I will be able to use my talents once again at RPC.

Looking for organs

Hello, everyone!

Yesterday, my Dad, sister Diane, and I went down to Oregon to visit Rodgers Instruments LLC. Rodgers of course is the company that produced the organs for Faith Presbyterian Church. I have been having in my mind to pick up a good home practice organ, since I was losing valuable sleep on Saturday nights practicing for church service on Sundays, usually hindering my ability to stay alert in the service the next day.
I had a couple major criteria looking for an organ. Firstly, it would have to be compact and easy to move around, since there isn’t much space in the apartment to fit it. Also, I wanted something that didn’t sound like an electronic instrument, and had a good variety of instruments. After wasting time on Craigslist and being terribly disappointed by the terrible selection at Prossers Piano and Organ, began looking into the major Classic Organ companies (Johannus, Allen, and Rodgers), and actually got to go preview the Johannus 37 SE at somebody’s apartment in downtown Seattle. Johannus has been having a half-off sale for sometime, so some of their organs were attractively priced, including the Opus 7 I was looking at. Frankly, I wasn’t impressed with the Johannus organ tones, which still sounded very electronic to me, especially the reeds. To me, there really is no comparison with the Rodgers organ sounds.
I discovered the Roland/Rodgers C-330 organ while surfing online, which just started selling a week ago and there has been a wild internet buzz for a while. Roland is coming out with a Classic series, where they are trying to make authentic-sounding harpsichords, pianos, and organs for homes. After looking into this organ a little bit, I discovered that it is a very special piece of equipment. For starters, it had packed in it over 100 different Rodgers pipe sounds. The organ had excellent acoustics for what I wanted. And the tone quality was phenomenal (hear samples here).
Here is a photo of me trying out the Roland/Rodgers C-330 at the Rodgers plant in Hillsboro, Oregon:

Finals week!

This coming week is finals week, so I have been doing my last-minute cramming. It’s been a while since I posted last, so I decided to take a little break and update my blog. I have four finals next week, E E 233 on Monday, E E 235 on Tuesday, Math 308 on Wednesday, and CSE 190M on Thursday. In my E E 233 class, we learned how to design filter circuits, and how to understand the signal produced by a circuit using Fourier analysis. E E 235 was pretty much the same material, except it was for general signals.

My E E 233 teacher, explaining the Laplace transform. (I sometimes take photos during class so I don’t have to take notes.)

In CSE 190M, we got experience with all sorts of different areas of web programming, including xhtml, css, javascript, php, sql, and more. Looking back, my understanding of web development dramatically increased this quarter, and I’m convinced I can now build a pretty high-quality web page.I am now working full time playing the organ and piano for Resurrection Presbyterian Church. Resurrection is now leasing the property of Summit Methodist Church in Puyallup. My brother in law, Andrew, maintains the home page at http://resurrectionpc.org/, as well as print the bulletins.

 

Here is one of the tracker organs in the practice rooms at the University of Washington that I do some of my practice on.

I have been involved with the Alliance of Christian Musicians, which brings musicians from different churches in the area to promote more traditional forms of music. Last weekend, they had their third meeting at Faith Presbyterian, and a couple violinists (Rosemary and Austin) from Faith and I put together a chamber transcription of a Bach concerto for the opening of the third meeting. After which, Mr. Bechtel, the organist at Faith, moderated a conversation among four professors from surrounding churches.

I’m waiting to hear back from Crane Aerospace and Electronics. A week ago, I had an interview for an internship position at the company. If I don’t get the job, I will be taking TC 333 Advanced Technical Writing, MATH 390 Statistics, and E E 271 Intro to Digital Circuits during the summer. I hope I get the job, because I need a little break from school — I have been taking at least 15 quarter hours for the past 2 and a half years now!